2018 Recommended Reading List (Part 1)

Featured image from the cover art for The Dark Issue 37, “Boy with a Torch Facing Smoke Monsters” by grandfailure

My short fiction recommendations are split into five categories: Part 1 – Dark Fantasy/Horror and Space-Based Science Fiction; Part 2 – Earthbound Science Fiction and First World Fantasy; Part 3 – Second World Fantasy. Each category features a “Desert Island Pick”, while the remaining picks are listed alphabetically by author. Each title is accompanied by a short synopsis and a quick excerpt for the story. Excerpts may contain mild spoilers.

Not every story fits neatly into any one category. Some could fit into more than one category, some defy categorization altogether. I did my best to place them where I thought they fit best. Links are included for stories that are available to read online, or to purchase information. Sometimes the traditional print magazines will make stories available online during award season, so I will update links when possible.

Short Stories (<7500 words), Novelettes (<17,500), and Novellas (<40,000)

Dark Fantasy/Horror

Desert Island Pick

Leviathan Sings to Me in the Deep” by Nibedita Sen [Nightmare Magazine Issue 69, June 2018; 5402 words]

nightmare 69
Cover Art by Andrey Kiselev

The Guild of Natural Philosophers is sponsoring Captain Bodkin’s final whaling voyage; their representative on the ship, Arcon Glass, has some unusual – and grisly – demands in exchange for the Guild’s support.

North of this organ he has placed a preserved section of the dense mass of tissue that lies beneath the oil organ; sailors call it the junk, for it provides no oil and has no use. His research, he explained to me, concerns itself with the spermaceti organ’s role in producing the unearthly noises that whales issue forth. He proceeded to demonstrate by connecting a number of wires and waxed cotton threads to the sac and tissue, then setting up a number of small drums at various angles to both. From his tools he produced a small instrument that he pressed against the soft swollen side of the wax and glycerine-filled organ and blew on—and lo, a low note echoed and swelled to great size and shivered off all corners of the room in a manner that rose the hairs on my arms.

The Best of the Rest

“Bondye Bon” by Monique L. Desir [FIYAH Literary Magazine Issue 5, Winter 2018; 4810 words]

The slaves of Andre Plantation rose up and overthrew their captors, and helped establish the United Tribes of Mother Africa in what was once the Southeastern United States of America. So why does Heloise’s Manman keep that creepy white man locked in her closet?

The familiarity of his face frightens me. He is dressed in ratty clothes: a grimy black shirt with frills at the throat and his sleeves with their stained ruffles set off the sickly paleness of his skin. He doesn’t try to move — no point in doing that, his wrists are shackled together with a chain, connected to a bolted plate in the wall. He looks up at me, eyes bright in the dark and smiles, baring his white, straight teeth.

It’s Easy to Shoot a Dog” by Maria Haskins [Beneath Ceaseless Skies Issue #260, September 13, 2018; 4470 words]

bcs 260
Cover Art: “Swamp Relic” by Piotr Dura

As a child Susanna struck an unholy bargain to acquire her beloved dog; a decade later the bill comes due.

They even burned a witch in town, just after Easter. She went to look, but though the woman’s hair was shorn and she was already burning, Susanna could tell it wasn’t anyone she knew. After, when the bones still smouldered, the priest in his stiff black cassock puffed himself up before the crowd, assuring them the witch’s spells and crafts would all unravel now that she was dead. Susanna stood there until dusk, waiting to see if anything would change, but the world remained the same as far as she could tell.

Triquetra” by Kirstyn McDermott [Tor.com, September 5, 2018; 11,826 words]

Snow White is all grown up now, living in a castle with her husband and daughter. Her wicked stepmother and that awful mirror are locked away, but one of them may be the key to saving her daughter from a horror worse than she faced in her own youth.

“You—” I cough, backing away from the table, away from the woman now supporting herself by its edge. “You spelled me!”
“Only your memory, Fairest. My needs are precise.”
“You—you wretched creature! I wish you had died on my wedding day!”
Smiling, she sinks back down into her chair. “No, you don’t. There is too much kindness in your heart, even now, even for such a wretched creature as myself.”

Black Fanged Thing” by Sam Rebelein [Shimmer Magazine Issue 41, January 2018; 4823 words]

Every sundown, a strange beast stalks the streets of town dragging its clatter of bottles behind it. Each bottle contains a slip of paper, one for every adult. If anyone wishes to know what is written on theirs, all they have to do is ask…

The pathetic, hunched little figure shuffled laboriously past Jude’s home, tugging those bottles on twine behind itself. Sisyphus against thousands of boulders.
The thing passed, and vanished around the bend at the other end of the lane. The neighborhood became silent. And the sun sank.
Phil sniffed. “Tomorrow, then,” he said.
“Tomorrow,” said Jude.

“Yard Dog” by Tade Thompson [FIYAH Literary Magazine Issue 7, Summer 2018; 2947 words]

fiyah 7
Cover Art by Mariama Alizor

Yard Dog plays music so glorious he can reduce the room to tears, turn the drinks sour, render all drugs useless. No one knows who he is or where he comes from, but before long someone comes looking for him.

Shed said it slower and louder. “Please. Have you. Seen my. BROTHER. Thank you.”
“I don’t know you or your brother. How did you get in, anyway? We’re not open. Get the fuck out of here.”
The way I heard it, Shed just smiled at her and went to use the john, but never came back out. Hours later when tempers had cooled somewhat, Sue got curious about him, had one of the men check the bathroom. They found his raggedy clothes, a trail of blood, strips of skin, meat and other fluids leading from the door to one of the stalls. Al said it was like he had shed his skin, which is how come we called him Shed. It wasn’t till later that we figured he was looking for Yard.

One for Sorrow, Two for Joy” by LaShawn M. Wanak [Fireside Magazine Issue 54, April 2018; 3471 words]

The Undertaker knows how to get the crows to take people’s sorrows away when they lose a loved one; but they also want something from her she refuses to give.

Walking down a sidewalk, hot tears streaming down her cheeks. Not aware of where she is, only knows that she’s been walking, walking so long that there are blisters on her feet, but the pain is nothing, nothing. A crow lands at her feet, pecking at the pavement before looking up at her with one black, bright eye.
—what you looking at? Think you can bring her back? Unless you can take away my pain, go, shoo, take off!

In the End, It Always Turns Out the Same” by A.C. Wise [The Dark Issue 37, June 2018; 3565 words]

One by one, the children on Richard McGinty’s school bus route are disappearing. So the sheriff does what any good sheriff would do, and calls the Super Teen Detective Squad – who’ve got their own issues to work out.

Lately she’s been having recurring dreams about murdering Greg. In fact, she’s dreamt about murdering every single member of the Teen Detective Squad. More than once, she’s woken with blood on her hands. She has no idea where the blood comes from. The only thing she knows for certain is that it isn’t hers. Sometimes she wonders if she’s spent so much time thinking about becoming a monster that she’s turned into one after all.

Space-Based Science Fiction

Desert Island Pick

Umbernight” by Carolyn Ives Gilman [Clarkesworld Magazine Issue 137, February 2018; 18,059 words]

clarkesworld 137
Cover Art: “Arrival” by Artur Sadlos

The colonists on Dust don’t know much of what happens to the surface of the planet when it faces Umber – the planet’s second star – they just know it’s deadly. When much needed supplies are dropped right in the middle of Umbernight, a brave few will find out why.

The road had sprouted all manner of creatures covered with plates and shells—little ziggurats and stepped pyramids, spirals, and domes. In between them floated bulbs like amber, airborne eggplants. They spurted a mucus that ate away any plastic it touched.
We topped a rise to find the valley before us completely crusted over with life, and no trace of a path. No longer could we avoid trampling through it, crushing it underfoot. Ahead, a translucent curtain suspended from floating, gas-filled bladders hung across our path. It shimmered with iridescent unlight.

The Best of the Rest

Traces of Us” by Vanessa Fogg [GigaNotoSaurus, March 1, 2018; 6572 words]

Two sentient starships cross paths in the vastness of space, each carrying a passenger that has been waiting a long time to connect with the other.

The ship contained the memories of over a thousand individuals. Recorded patterns of synaptic firing, waves of electrical and biochemical activity: the preserved symphonies of a human mind.
The minds currently conscious in and around the ship were not the same as their flesh-and-blood progenitors, the human beings of Old Earth. These new minds had had centuries to meld with one another and evolve; to modify themselves. They delighted in sensory inputs unimaginable to Homo sapiens—some could sense the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Some could consciously track the movement of a single electron or see all the radiating energies of a star.
Yet the second ship requested the recording of a single unmodified mind from the first.

Fleeing Oslyge” by Sally Gwylan [Clarkesworld Magazine Issue 140, May 2018; 9216 words]

After the invaders overrun her home town, Senne takes refuge with a group of soldiers searching for the rest of their unit. Not everyone in the group may be trustworthy.

Better the cold mist and these days of hunger and endless walking than trying to hide in broken Oslyge. Better this than letting myself be taken to the camps the Tysthänder, the Peace Hands, claim are for our safety. Our safety in this time of transition; that’s what their bulletins said. No one is sure whether the invaders—“project administrators” as they call themselves—are of human stock, as we are, or are alien.
Their guards are human enough.

“Inscribed on Dark Water” by Gregor Hartmann [Interzone #277, September/October 2018; 8205 words]

interzone 277
Cover Art by Vince Haig

Olani is a young marine biologist interning at a fuel refinery on the frontier planet Zephyr. She’s not getting much out of her time there: most of the crew either ignores her or treats her with disdain and she basically just mops up shit all day. When an inspection crew comes to the plant she has an opportunity to advance her career and she must decide if she’s the kind of person who will do whatever it takes to get ahead.

Olani was a child when Pico erupted. The supervolcano vomited up so much gas and debris that Zephyr’s albedo increased. Light bounced off the cloud tops and back into space instead of heating the atmosphere. The temperature fell inexorably. As a kid, Olani had fun doing unusual things like playing in snow in an equatorial city. Only later did she understand why adults were whispering and crying.

It was touch and go for a long time. If the sea had frozen over, the oxygen produced by phytoplankton wouldn’t have been released to the atmosphere and everyone would have suffocated. Ocean, bless them, had kept that from happening. If you were looking for heroes of applied marine biology, Ocean was the place to find them.

“Prophet of the Roads” by Naomi Kritzer [Infinity’s End, Solaris; 4721 words]

The Engineer was an AI that once shaped the course of human development; now it exists only in fragments. With the solar system mired in violent conflict, Luca hopes to reunite the fragments and return human society to a state of peace and prosperity.

I was on a ship in orbit, so I didn’t watch people die; I went down, searching for survivors, since we’d been told they were well-prepared, defiant, probably equipped with pressure suits and subdomes and any number of other possibilities. Instead, we found bodies of civilians. In the moments before death, people clung to one another, uselessly trying to shield their loved ones from the vacuum of space that was rushing in around them.
In the dream, I look for the Engineer, but do not find it. Everything is destroyed. Everything.

The Hydraulic Emperor” by Arkady Martine [Uncanny Magazine Issue 20, January/February 2018; 6601 words]

Kinesis Industrial One hires Mallory Iheji to win an auction for a rare and mysterious Qath box. The reward – a long lost film made by her favorite artist – should be more than worth her risk, but the Qath only accept personal sacrifices as payment and more than a few participants are willing to give up anything to get it.

I’m not into aliens the way the Qath groupies are into aliens. A Qath box doesn’t do anything. It doesn’t tell you anything about someone else’s mind; it won’t let you out of yourself, even for a minute. It’s just not human, which apparently gets to some people: the strangeness of it, of owning something made by otherwise life, otherwise minds. The Qath are the only aliens we’ve got, and they don’t interact with us much—but they like their auctions. Their auctions and their little boxes. What Kinesis Industrial wanted with one I wasn’t sure I wanted to know.

The Wait is Longer Than You Think” by Adrian Simmons [GigaNotoSaurus, May 1, 2018; 7813 words]

Like most humans, John is a social animal. He’s marooned on a remote planet with a Kinri named Colophinanoc and the Kinri can’t conceive of why anyone would require social interaction to maintain their mental health. And any possible rescue is years away.

Colophinanoc was a captive audience. It was crucial that Colophinanoc didn’t feel like a captive audience.
If that happened, Colophinanoc would surely suggest that they leave off the fishing boat and work on the traps—which they did separately. It had not taken long for Colophinanoc to come up with a dozen or more tasks that they did separately.
He waited; watched the sunken fan tree where they had herded the fish. In his impatience, the words came to fast. He couldn’t wait anymore. “Yeah, so there we are, Sully and I, trying not to bust out laughing at Nanooni and—” the slightest shiver runs through the reed boat, Colophinanoc shifting, Colophinanoc getting sick of him.

The Freeze-Frame Revolution by Peter Watts [Tachyon Publications; 41,275 words]

freeze frame rev
Cover Art by Elizabeth Story

The starship Eriophora treks across the galaxy, waking various crew members for a few days every thousand years or so when it needs assistance building gates for other ships to fast-travel through. These are not ideal conditions to stage a mutiny, but Sunday Ahzmundin is going to try anyway.

Back when we first shipped out I played this game with myself. Every time I thawed, I’d subtract the duration of our voyage from the date of our departure; then check to see when we’d be if Eriophora were a time machine, if we’d been moving back through history instead of out through the cosmos. Oh look: all the way back to the Industrial Revolution in the time it took us to reach our first build. Two builds took us to the Golden Age of Islam, seven to the Shang Dynasty.
I guess it was my way of trying to keep some kind of connection, to measure this most immortal of endeavors on a scale that meat could feel in the gut. It didn’t work out, though. Did exactly the opposite in fact, ended up rubbing my nose in the sheer absurd hubris of even trying to contain the Diaspora within the pitiful limits of earthbound history.

(Though The Freeze-Frame Revolution is slightly over the word limit, the author considers it a novella and Hugo rules allow some leeway for stories within twenty percent of the limit if the committee deems it appropriate. I am unsure if other awards have similar caveats.)

Artificial Condition (The Murderbot Diaries) by Martha Wells [Tor.com Publishing; 32,446 words]

Murderbot takes a job protecting a group of scientists who are trying to negotiate the return of their data from the company that fired them, but its true goal is recovering information about its own troubled past.

“I’m not your crew. I’m not a human. I’m a construct. Constructs and bots can’t trust each other.”
It was quiet for ten precious seconds, though I could tell from the spike in its feed activity it was doing something. I realized it must be searching its databases, looking for a way to refute my statement. Then it said, Why not?
I had spent so much time pretending to be patient with humans asking stupid questions. I should have more self-control than this. “Because we both have to follow human orders. A human could tell you to purge my memory. A human could tell me to destroy your systems.”
I thought it would argue that I couldn’t possibly hurt it, which would derail the whole conversation.
But it said, There are no humans here now.
I realized I had been trapped into this conversational dead end, with the transport pretending to need this explained in order to get me to articulate it to myself. I didn’t know who I was more annoyed at, myself or it. No, I was definitely more annoyed at it.

The list continues with parts 2 and 3.

You can also check out my monthly Best Of columns for more great recommendations!

The Best Short SFF – July 2018

Reminder: While many of the stories in this column are available to read free online, these venues pay the authors for their work and rely on income from readers to do so. If one or more of these zines consistently publishes fiction that you like, please consider buying a subscription. Or, if you read a story or stories that you especially like, consider purchasing the issue it appears in. If the story is available to read online, clicking on the name of the story will send you there; subscription/donation/purchase information is available at each site. For stories that are not available to read online, there is a link to that zine’s home page. Thank you for reading and supporting short form SFF!
I was out of commission for a couple of weeks this month, so I didn’t get a chance to write up all my zine reviews. I did get all my reading done, however, and I must say it was an odd month for short fiction. I found myself underwhelmed by several reliably good periodicals: Shimmer, Fireside, Apex, Uncanny, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Tor.com – there were some interesting stories here and there, but also a lot of meh, and not a single rec from among them. The good stuff, though, was really good.

Must Read

Lightspeed 98

A Song of Home, the Organ Grinds”, James Beamon (Lightspeed Magazine Issue 98, July 2018) Short Story
War between Turkey and Russia rages on in this 19th century steampunk adventure. Aboard the Turkish airship Kismet, organ grinder Hezarfen plays patriotic songs while sending his platoon of zombie attack monkeys to board enemy ships. 14-year-old Oz tends to the monkeys, though he is terrified of them. He is terrified of most things in fact, and looks forward to becoming a man at 15, when he assumes he will find his courage. “A Song of Home, the Organ Grinds” is vibrant for a war story, but no less perturbing. Hezarfen is fully invested in the torment and turmoil of bloody conflict, evincing a casual yet imperious cruelty toward Oz and the monkeys. The Kismet’s climactic battle with the Russian flagship Voina Gulag is a masterful crescendo, spiked with a precise and potent dose of dramatic irony.
Gubbinal”, Lavie Tidhar (Clarkesworld Magazine Issue 142, July 2018) Short Story
Wallace Steven’s famous poem “Gubbinal” admonishes those who lack the imagination to see beauty in the world, with its repeated refrain “Have it your way/The world is ugly/And the people are sad”. Sahar, the hero of Lavie Tidhar’s story of the same name, is looking to escape the “endless chatter of grunting and farting and laughing and shouting” in Titan’s human habitat, to explore the “beautiful untamed music of the moon.” Her adventure takes her across a dangerous, unforgiving landscape full of astounding creatures, deadly pirates and impossible artifacts. The lunkheads back home can have it their way; in Tidhar’s hands, the world is anything but ugly or sad.

Highly Regarded

“This Isn’t Better”, Rebecca Birch (Galaxy’s Edge, July/August 2018) Short Story
Caleb mostly hides away from the endless shouting matches between his mother and his stepdad, until he discovers that he can take care of his problems by writing them down in his journal, then burning the page. This power has unintended consequences, and soon Caleb realizes he can use it to burn away his own humanity if he chooses to. This is one of those stories that made me want to read it again right away. “This Isn’t Better” is told in terse prose, packed solid with the anxiety and self-loathing that children raised in toxic households must endure.
“A Stab of the Knife”, Adam-Troy Castro (Analog Science Fiction and Fact, July/August 2018) Novella
I’ve been looking forward to this AIsource Infection team-up between the driven and damaged councilor Andrea Cort and the equally headstrong superspy Draiken since it was teased at the end of the last Draiken story, “Blurred Lives.” Cort has information Draiken needs to find the men he wants to bring to justice, so when he arrives in New London, he stakes her out like any good spy would. Their first encounter, in which Cort easily sniffs out and traps her pursuer, more than lived up to my expectations with electric tension and crackling dialogue. The two form a tentative truce, but once Draiken becomes entangled in the Byzantine workings of Cort’s world, he discovers he may not survive long enough to get what he needs from her. “A Stab of the Knife” isn’t quite among the best of the Cort stories, nor is it the best of the Draiken cycle, but the giddy buzz I felt from the start is sustained throughout, and the breakneck action of the second half (along with all the cool gadgets) pays dividends.Fiyah 7

“The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit”, Eboni J. Dunbar (FIYAH Literary Magazine Issue 7, Summer 2018) Short Story
Think Downton Abbey with vampires (!!!). Eboni J. Dunbar’s “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” finds the famous “Diva extraordinaire” Anna Maria Percival playing a benefit concert in the provincial Hampshire House, home of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Bennett. The concert is just a ruse: Mrs. Percival and her sister-in-law Eleanor are vampire hunters, and Mr. Bennett suspects his brother Henry may have been turned. It seems Mrs. Percival’s music has the power to hypnotize an audience of the living, as well as beckon the living dead to her. “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” is near-perfect balance of lush setting and incisive character detail, leading to a suspenseful and exciting climax. I humbly request the author revisit this world in future stories.
“Lieutenant Tightass”, Kristine Kathryn Rusch (Asimov’s Science Fiction, July/August 2018) Novelette
A new entry in Rusch’s Diving series – this takes place long before the other stories and novels and is an easy entry point for the uninitiated. Well before he became captain of the Ivoire, Jonathan “Coop” Cooper was a newly minted lieutenant assigned to the Arama, a search and rescue vessel for other ships that get lost in foldspace – a depressing and mostly fruitless endeavor, as ships lost in foldspace are almost never recovered. The Voimakas is one such ship, and Coop has a daring new theory about how to recover it. His only problem is getting Captain Nisen, who flaunts fleet regulations and mercilessly harangues him with the titular nickname (and encourages the rest of her crew to do the same), to mount a dangerous rescue based on his calculations. “Lieutenant Tightass” has the kind of kinetic plotting and tense action we’ve come to expect from procedural SF master Rusch. The ending labors the “point” a little too much, and the point being that Nisen’s bullying is for Coop’s own good makes it a tough sell. It’s a thrilling tale up to then, and the climactic rescue attempt is a knockout.
“Yard Dog”, Tade Thompson (FIYAH Literary Magazine Issue 7, Summer 2018) Short Story
Saucy Sue’s is a jazz club where only serious musicians dare to play; when a mysterious new stranger called Yard Dog is finally given the chance to prove his chops, he doesn’t just bring the house down, he reduces the room to tears. More than that, the drinks turn sour and “the drug fiends even said there was no dragon to chase.” Then Yard Dog’s “brother” starts hanging around the club, beckoning him to return home. “Yard Dog” gradually modulates from a macabre eeriness to a sublime, metaphysical terror in its expression of a music too resplendent for the mortal world. I especially liked the narrator’s sharp, penetrating voice.

Also Recommended

“Rules of Biology”, Dale Bailey (Asimov’s Science Fiction, July/August 2018) Short Story
A Twilight Zone-ish fable about an absent father whose teenage daughter begins exhibiting the genetic characteristics of the man who has taken his place as the head of the household.
“Morbier”, R.S. Benedict (The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July/August 2018) Short Story
Trish falls in love with Mara at first sight and gets her a job at the country club where she works. Trish assumes Mara is a little cuckoo when she claims to be a time traveler from the year 2093, and conveniently overlooks evidence it may be true. The setting and characters foster a light, fun vibe from the get go; eventually the non-linear structure and Mara’s behavioral cues portend a La Jetée-style tragedy.
Greetings, Humanity! Welcome to Your Choice of Species”, Adam-Troy Castro (Lightspeed Magazine Issue 98, July 2018) Short Story
One of Castro’s acerbic humor pieces – The Exalted High Tribunal of the Interstellar Commission on the Minimum Standards of Indigenous Cultures has deemed humanity unworthy of existence and is prepared to reassign us to a different species.

Galaxy's Edge 33“Conceit and Capability”, Deborah L. Davitt (Galaxy’s Edge, July/August 2018) Short Story
A riff on the famous opening sentence of Pride and Prejudice leads to a sly send-up of male hubris. When Matilda joins her brother on an expedition to find a dragon she must contend with her sibling’s comically absurd self-regard, along with whatever creature they might discover.
“Left to Take the Lead”, Marissa Lingen (Analog Science Fiction and Fact, July/August 2018) Novelette
One of the author’s Oort cloud stories. Holly must work as an indenture on earth as her down-on-their-luck family tries to gather the funds to bring everyone together again. Lingen’s story cycle often centers around the idea of how humanity’s colonization of the solar system changes how the concept of family is perceived by different groups of people, and this is one of the most moving examples.
The James Machine”, Kate Osias (Clarkesworld Magazine Issue 142, July 2018) Short Story
Cat built an AI out of her dying husband’s memories and personality, but the result isn’t quite what she expected. A smart and measured take on the grief of losing a spouse.
“Stones in the Water, Cottage on the Mountain”, Suzanne Palmer (Asimov’s Science Fiction, July/August 2018) Short Story
Multiple apocalypses in multiple timelines seem bent on stopping a woman from reaching her destination. Palmer devises several very creative end-of-the-world scenarios, and I always enjoy the bitterly funny tone of her tales.
“Visible Cities”, Rachel Pollack (The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July/August 2018) Novelette
A bittersweet, lyrical side story in Pollack’s Jack Shade series, focusing on the origin story of the traveler Carolien, who goes on a magic-tinged hunt for her teacher when he abruptly disappears. Worth a look even if you haven’t read the other Shade tales yet.
“Eyes That Linger”, D.A. Xiaolin Spires (Galaxy’s Edge, July/August 2018) Short Story
A spooky little tale of mad science about a PI investigating people who have eyes and other organs grafted onto various appendages.
“Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down”, Lashawn M. Wanak (FIYAH Literary Magazine Issue 7, Summer 2018) Novelette
1930s America is beset by a sporous pandemic that turns people into wood-like “stumps.” Singers (especially Black singers) are conscripted into the service of the SPC (Stump Prevention Control), because only by hitting a certain, very difficult note, can they coax the stumps to release their spores under quarantine, thereby rendering the stumps inert. A rollicking alt-history romp featuring succinct social commentary about the exploitation of Black musicians by white American culture.